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Powerball winner’s ex-husband was killed in 2016 hit-and-run | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Powerball winner’s ex-husband was killed in 2016 hit-and-run

The Associated Press
| Friday, August 25, 2017 12:00 p.m
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A cashier, left, makes a sale to Nicholas Scott, of Chicopee, Mass., right, at the Pride Station & Store, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Chicopee, where the winning ticket for the Powerball was sold. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
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One customer, left, holds the door for another at the Pride Station & Store on Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Chicopee, Mass., where the winning ticket for the Powerball was sold. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
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Bob Bolduc, founder and owner of Pride stores, smiles as he takes questions from members of the media during a news conference at the Pride Station & Store, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Chicopee, Mass., where the winning ticket for the Powerball was sold. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
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A customer is handed a Powerball ticket in Omaha, Neb., Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million. The second -largest on record for any U.S. lottery game. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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A Powerball lottery sign displays the lottery prizes at a convenience store Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017, in Northbrook, Ill. Lottery officials said the grand prize for Wednesday night's drawing has reached $700 million, the second -largest on record for any U.S. lottery game.
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
While it wasn't the jackpot, one of four $1 million winning Powerball tickets in Wednesday's drawing was sold at this Marathon station in Tarentum.
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Courtesy of Hearst Television Inc.
Mavis Wanczyk, 53, of Chicopee, Mass., came forward Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, as the winner of Wednesday's Powerball jackpot.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
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Mavis Wanczyk, of Chicopee, Mass., speaks during a news conference where she claimed the $758.7 million Powerball prize at Massachusetts State Lottery headquarters, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Braintree, Mass. Officials said it is the largest single-ticket Powerball prize in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
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Mavis Wanczyk, right, of Chicopee, Mass., laughs beside state treasurer Deb Goldberg during a news conference where she claimed the $758.7 million Powerball prize at Massachusetts State Lottery headquarters, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Braintree, Mass. Officials said it is the largest single-ticket Powerball prize in U.S. history. At left are Wancyk's mother and two sisters. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

BOSTON — The ex-husband of the woman who won the $758.7 million Powerball prize was killed last year in a hit-and-run.

MassLive.com reports that court records show Mavis and William Wanczyk divorced in 2012.

William Wanczyk, 55, of Northampton, was killed in November when he was sitting at a bus shelter in Amherst, Mass., and a pickup truck plowed into it. He had served as a Northampton firefighter from 1986 to 1989 before being injured on the job.

Peter Sheremeta, 20, of Belchertown, was later arrested and charged with manslaughter, motor vehicle homicide, drunken driving and other charges.

He has pleaded not guilty. Authorities say a truck without its headlights on was seen speeding before it started to fishtail, drove onto the sidewalk and struck the bus shelter. The heavily damaged truck was found abandoned nearby.

The couple’s daughter, Marlee Wanczyk, told The Republican newspaper at the time of Sheremeta’s arraignment that her father was a “wise-cracker” who enjoyed playing practical jokes.

The 53-year-old hospital worker from Chicopee quit her job on Thursday after learning she had won the prize, the biggest undivided lottery jackpot in U.S. history. Lottery officials say she chose to take a lump sum payment of $480 million, or $336 million after taxes.

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