Archive

ShareThis Page
Amazon to buy online pharmacy PillPack | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Amazon to buy online pharmacy PillPack

The Associated Press
webamazon5
Mark Lennihan/AP
AmazonDelivery00829jpg2e310
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program that lets entrepreneurs around the country launch businesses that deliver Amazon packages. It's another way for Amazon to gain greater control over how its packages are delivered. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery01519jpgc5007
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery40456jpge9cf1
Parisa Sadrzadeh, left, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery85283jpg628dc
Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery72439jpg08d53
Parisa Sadrzadeh, center, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, demonstrates a package delivery for journalists, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, at a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery06633jpg89181
Parisa Sadrzadeh, a senior manager of logistics for Amazon.com, opens the door of an Amazon-branded delivery van at the request of a photographer, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, following a media event in Seattle to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery64375jpgfd12b
Dave Clark, back center right, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, and Olaoluwa Abimbola, back center left, one of Amazon's beta participants in a new delivery business offering, talk to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery20210jpgd7e41
Olaoluwa Abimbola, one of Amazon.com's beta participants in a new delivery business offering, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to get Amazon Prime-branded vans and support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AmazonDelivery44439jpgda5c5
Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon.com, talks to reporters, Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in Seattle, at a media event to announce a new program for entrepreneurs to sign on to use Amazon Prime-branded vans and get support from the company as they form businesses to deliver Amazon packages. The move comes as Amazon is trying to take more control over its delivery operations and to build up its own shipping and logistics, which are currently handled by UPS, the U.S. Postal Service and other delivery services. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Amazon.com Inc. is buying PillPack, an online pharmacy that offers pre-sorted dose packaging and home delivery.

Financial terms weren’t disclosed.

Amazon said Thursday PillPack offers a combination of deep pharmacy experience and a focus on technology.

The company, which has its primary pharmacy in Manchester, New Hampshire, ships to all states except Hawaii.

The companies expect to close the deal later this year.

In premarket trading, shares of drugstore chains Walgreens, CVS and Rite Aid slid.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.