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Snowstorm batters parts of Midwest, 100s of flights canceled | TribLIVE.com
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Snowstorm batters parts of Midwest, 100s of flights canceled

The Associated Press
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It was only the third time Kristin Brooker, now living in Los Angeles, had seen snow, so a selfie was in order Sunday, Nov. 25,2018 with friend Dominic Francia, who grew up in Kansas City. The pair stopped on their walk around the Country Club Plaza just as the heavy snow began to fall. Both now live in Los Angeles.
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Police from Roeland Park, Kan., watched as the driver of a van tried to a navigate a slick street Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018, that hit the Kansas City area. A winter storm blanketed much of the central Midwest with snow on Sunday at the end of the Thanksgiving weekend, bringing blizzard-like conditions that grounded hundreds of flights and forced the closure of major highways on one of the busiest travel days of the year. (Tammy Ljungblad/The Kansas City Star via AP)
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A Pontiac Star Chief for sale is seen in a snow drift along U.S. 75 near Nebraska City, Neb., Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. Blizzard-like conditions have closed highways and delayed air travel as a winter storm moves through the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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A Chrysler Imperial for sale is seen in a snow drift along U.S. 75 near Nebraska City, Neb., Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. Blizzard-like conditions have closed highways and delayed air travel as a winter storm moves through the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Rows of corn stalks stand in blowing snow north of Nebraska City, Neb., Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. Blizzard-like conditions have closed highways and delayed air travel as a winter storm moves through the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Rows of corn stalks stand in blowing snow north of Nebraska City, Neb., Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. Blizzard-like conditions have closed highways and delayed air travel as a winter storm moves through the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

CHICAGO — A wintry storm brought blizzard-like conditions to parts of the Midwest early Monday, grounding hundreds of flights and causing some road traffic chaos as commuters returned to work after the Thanksgiving weekend.

The Chicago Department of Aviation reported early Monday that average departure delays at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport are 77 minutes, and the flight-tracking website FlightAware reported that more than 350 flights headed to or from the U.S. were canceled.

Heavy snow was expected to continue through the early hours of Monday with up to a foot (30 centimeters) of snow expected in Chicago, including wind gusts of up to 50 mph (80 kph) likely to cause whiteout conditions, according to The National Weather Service.

Parts of southeastern Wisconsin, just north of Chicago, suffered a glancing blow from the storm, with about 9 inches (23 centimeters) of blowing and drifting snow.

On Sunday, Gov. Jeff Colyer declared a state of emergency after 2 to 14 inches (5 to 36 centimeters) of snow fell in parts of Kansas. The state Department of Transportation reported several road closures Monday, mostly in the extreme northeast, but said a stretch of Interstate 70 that had been closed on Sunday was reopened.

The National Weather Service said that 3 to 9 inches fell across northern Missouri on Sunday. The Missouri State Highway Patrol reported multiple fender-benders but by midmorning on Monday the Department of Transportation said all roads were opened. Flights were mostly on time Monday at Kansas City International Airport, one day after the storm caused widespread delays.

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