Archive

U.S. Marshal killed outside Tucson house; suspect arrested | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

U.S. Marshal killed outside Tucson house; suspect arrested

The Associated Press
498207498207a0b65a3fc9984e15a021458078042740
Law enforcement personnel continue their investigation at the scene following a shooting Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, in Tucson, Ariz. A deputy U.S. marshal serving a felony arrest warrant was shot and killed outside the Tucson house the night before. The suspect was arrested after an hour-long standoff at the home. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
49820749820795994f1cec9b4d259a3af81e0921275e
In this Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018 photo, a Tucson Police Department Officer stands stands outside the house where a suspect is holed up following a shooting in Tucson, Ariz. A deputy U.S. marshal serving a felony arrest warrant was shot and killed outside the Tucson house. The suspect was arrested after an hour-long standoff at the home. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
498207498207d414c1e13a7c4283ae1cc1840a8a4090
In this Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018 photo, Tucson Police Officers stand by a police car with a man detained in the back seat following a shooting in Tucson, Ariz. A deputy U.S. marshal serving a felony arrest warrant was shot and killed outside the Tucson house. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
4982074982078b76d43d3ad246b5b082b1de3e3cf838
Law enforcement personnel continue their investigation at the scene following a shooting Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, in Tucson, Ariz. A deputy U.S. marshal serving a felony arrest warrant was shot and killed outside the Tucson house the night before. The suspect was arrested after an hour-long standoff at the home. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
49820749820769dfc0ad175041ca89f83ef4f866de7e
This undated photo released by the Pima County Sheriff's Department shows Ryan Phillip Schlesinger. A deputy U.S. marshal serving a fugitive arrest warrant against Schlesinger, accused of stalking a female police sergeant after she seized a handgun and ammunition from him last year, has been shot and killed outside a Tucson, Arizona house. Chase White, 41, was shot while serving the warrant Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. White died later at a hospital, the U.S. Marshals Service in Washington said Friday. The suspect, Schlesinger, was arrested after an hour-long standoff at the home. (Pima County Sheriff's Department via AP)
4982074982077d57e4e272d64e88bd0d1a00fe132ea3
Law enforcement personnel talk to residents in the neighborhood as they continue their investigation at the scene following a shooting Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, in Tucson, Ariz. A deputy U.S. marshal serving a felony arrest warrant was shot and killed outside the Tucson house the night before. The suspect was arrested after an hour-long standoff at the home. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star via AP)

PHOENIX — A deputy U.S. marshal serving a fugitive arrest warrant against a man accused of stalking a female police sergeant after she seized a handgun and ammunition from him last year has been shot and killed outside a Tucson house.

The suspect had recently visited the Tucson Police Department, where he confronted the sergeant in person, then filed an online complaint about last year’s seizure of his weapon, demanding that she and other officers be “arrested” and warning against the possibility of a “shootout at the OK Corral,” authorities said.

Chase White, 41, was shot while serving the warrant Thursday night. White died later at a hospital, the U.S. Marshals Service said Friday. He had a wife and four children ranging in age from 7 to 14 and had been scheduled to start a deployment of up to three years with the Air Force Reserve on Monday.

The suspect, Ryan Phillip Schlesinger, was arrested after an hourlong standoff at the home.

Friday filings in federal court show that Schlesinger was arrested on a warrant charging him with first-degree murder of a federal officer. The crime carries a penalty of death or life imprisonment and the FBI will lead the investigation, assisted by Tucson police and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The earlier warrant had accused Schlesinger of stalking Sgt. Amber Kingman, who was involved in his earlier arrest and the seizure of his Glock handgun and ammunition.

The complaint against Schlesinger, 26, said the Marshals Service was serving the warrant at a home on the city’s north side about 5:30 p.m. Thursday when the suspect fired, striking White. Schlesinger was not wounded when agents returned fire.

Schlesinger was taken into custody about an hour later when he emerged from the house wearing body armor and a ballistic helmet.

Officers from local and federal law enforcement agencies mourned White at a Friday news conference at the Tucson federal courthouse, with U.S. Marshal David Gonzales of the District of Arizona choking up several times. Gonzales says he and others had endured “an impossibly hard day” and it will “take us a long time to heal.”

The complaint said the warrant sprang from an Aug. 18, 2017 incident in which Tucson officers, including Kingman, went to Schlesinger’s house on a petition related to a section of state law dealing with health matters.

Law enforcers at the conference declined to answer questions about Schlesinger’s mental health. “His mental issues will be part of these investigations,” Gonzales said.

When the Tucson officers reached the entryway of Schlesinger’s bedroom, he threatened to kill them and reached for a Glock. Officers using a stun gun arrested Schlesinger and seized the handgun, along with “a high capacity magazine loaded with specialized ammunition designed for increased penetration.”

Schlesinger in April began sending threatening emails to Tucson police demanding the return of his gun and other property.

The complaint said Schlesinger told Tucson detectives July 3 he was sending the emails in “retaliation” for the seizure of his property and had “been planning to come to the police station on that day to arrest several officers.” Schlesinger reportedly said that if the officers resisted arrest, “force would be used.” He replied “no comment” when asked if he had access to firearms.

“Schlesinger stated that he believed his actions were justified by the U.S. Constitution and that he was prepared to defend the Constitution by any means necessary,” the complaint stated. It said that at the time there were two active injunctions barring Schlesinger from harassment and from possessing firearms.

Throughout July, August and September, the complaint said, Schlesinger repeatedly showed up at the police department to “arrest” Kingman, knocked on her parents’ front door and alleged she and other officers had “kidnapped, assaulted, conspired and unlawfully imprisoned him in the Crisis Response Center.”

When Schlesinger went to police headquarters Nov. 20, he saw Kingman and addressed her by name.

Two days later, he filed an online complaint, saying Kingman was on his “list” and recommending the department “arrest the criminals listed in my report so I don’t have to. I don’t think anybody wants this turning into shootout at the OK Corral.”

Stuart De Haan, an attorney representing Schlesinger in a harassment case pending in Pima County Justice Court in Tucson, did not immediately respond Friday to a telephone call seeking comment.

Schlesinger was booked into the Pima County jail in Tucson and made an initial appearance in court Friday. A detention and preliminary hearing was set for Tuesday.

Raised in central Illinois, White had been with the U.S. Marshals Service since 2015. He was on active duty in the Air Force from 2000-07 and was currently a lieutenant colonel in the Air Force Reserve, serving with the 926th Wing at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada and preparing for a deployment.

David J. Anderson, Acting Deputy Director of the U.S. Marshals Service, called White a “hero” who had been performing a dangerous job.

First Assistant U.S. Attorney Elizabeth A. Strange of the Arizona District said White’s death was a reminder “of the dangers our dedicated law enforcement partners willingly face daily in the line of duty.” Tucson Police Chief Chris Magnus said it had been “a tragic night for law enforcement in Tucson and across the state of Arizona.”

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey on Twitter expressed condolences to the deputy marshal’s family and said “prayers go out to his family and all of Arizona law enforcement.” He ordered that flags at state buildings to be lowered to half-staff through Saturday evening.

The Marshals Service said the deputy U.S. marshal was the first killed in the line of duty in Tucson in 66 years.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.