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What to watch for as senators consider Kavanaugh nomination

The Associated Press
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In this Aug. 7, 2018, photo. President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Atlanta at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington. America is about to get its first extended look at Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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An American flag flies outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018, as the Senate prepares for the confirmation hearing this week of President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set for a week of marathon hearings before the Judiciary Committee, where senators will drill down into the judge’s background, writings and legal philosophy.

Republicans are focusing on Kavanaugh’s 12-year career as an appellate court judge while Democrats are expected to grill the 53-year-old conservative on hot-button issues that could swing the court’s majority rightward.

Four days of hearings begin Tuesday morning. Democratic leader Chuck Schumer is fuming over the committee receiving more than 42,000 pages of documents about Kavanaugh’s years with the Bush administration the night before the hearings get underway. He’s calling for a delay until Kavanaugh’s records can be reviewed.

Democrats have argued for weeks that Kavanaugh’s Bush administration records aren’t being provided for review to the fullest extent possible.

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