Archive

White House unveils holiday decor, National Mall in gingerbread | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

White House unveils holiday decor, National Mall in gingerbread

The Associated Press
481833481833dd3acc781ff14bf5891e73b211f376aa
The first family’s official Christmas ornament is seen during the press preview at the White House on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. First lady Melania Trump unveiled the holiday decor. She designed the decor, which features a theme of “American Treasures.”
481833481833b6a4a3c7cfd642b1b9231e86ce795f86
The Cross Hall is decked out for Christmas at the White House on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. First lady Melania Trump unveiled the 2018 White House holiday decor on Monday. She designed the decor, which features a theme of “American Treasures.”
48183348183385659259a797423999cdbcdacf4a9a74
The official 2018 White House Christmas ornament is on display at the White House on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. First lady Melania Trump unveiled the 2018 White House holiday decor on Monday. She designed the decor, which features a theme of “American Treasures.”
481833481833cbcd03d016804760bf38cbbaec6cccdc
The official White House Christmas tree is seen in the Blue Room during the Christmas press preview at the White House in Washington on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. The tree measures 18 feet tall and is dressed in more than 500 feet of blue velvet ribbon embroidered in gold with each state and territory.
48183348183344e1567f211f4925b78f777467ecabc4
The gingerbread house, showcasing the full expanse of the National Mall — the Capitol, Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, Washington Monument and the White House — is seen in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. First lady Melania Trump unveiled the holiday decor, which she designed and which features a theme of “American Treasures.”

WASHINGTON — The traditional White House gingerbread house isn’t exactly a house this year. It’s a massive, sugary replica of the entire National Mall.

The pastry creation — featured at Monday’s unveiling of the White House holiday decorations — required 225 pounds of dough, 25 pounds of chocolate and 20 pounds of white icing. It includes replicas of the Capitol, the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials, the Washington Monument and the White House, complete with tiny green wreaths with red ribbons on each window.

White House pastry chefs have created gingerbread houses during the holidays since the early 1970s. The first one depicted a Christmas village. Another was a replica of President Bill Clinton’s boyhood home in Arkansas.

“American Treasures” is the theme of this year’s White House holiday decor, designed by first lady Melania Trump, who tweeted a video showing her walking amid the display. Decorations in the ornate East Room are meant to highlight the diversity and ingenuity of American architecture.

Four custom-made mantelpieces feature the skylines of New York, St. Louis, Chicago and San Francisco. Seventy-two handmade paper ornaments representing six regions across the nation adorn four 14-foot fir trees. In the library, trees are decorated with ornaments from all states and territories.

In the China Room, there are three tables recreated from previous state dinners during the Theodore Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Trump administrations using china and glassware from the White House permanent collection. A place card for President Donald Trump is next to one for “Mrs. Macron,” French President Emmanuel Macron’s wife, Brigitte.

Upstairs in the Green Room, there are decorations representing an American cornucopia with fruits, vegetables and grains adorning a tree.

The 18-foot official White House Christmas tree stands tall in the center of the Blue Room. The Fraser fir from North Carolina is decorated with more than 500 feet of blue velvet ribbon embroidered in gold with each state and territory.

The Red Room features ornaments and two wreaths made of pencils stamped with “Be Best,” Mrs. Trump’s youth initiative.

Patriotism is on display in the Grand Foyer and Cross Hall. More than 14,000 red ornaments hang on the branches of 29 trees. Hidden projectors cast silhouettes of pine and other holiday greenery on the ceilings.

From their portraits on the walls of the corridor, Presidents John F. Kennedy, Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan gaze down on the holiday spectacle.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.