Archive

Young Steel Valley players looking for experience | TribLIVE.com
News

Young Steel Valley players looking for experience

The Steel Valley girls basketball team returns most of its players, but Steel Valley coach Brittany Youngblood still considers it a rebuilding year.

“We’ve very young,” said Youngblood, noting many returnees lack abundant experience.

Steel Valley kicks off the season Dec. 5-6 in a tournament at Montour. Its Section 3-AA opener is scheduled the following week against visiting Chartiers-Houston.

Cayley Labishak, who led the team with 10 points per game last year, is Steel Valley’s lone senior.

Deja Bray, a 5-foot-8 junior forward, impressed her coach by pulling down 19 rebounds against a taller player in a recent scrimmage against California.

“Deja is very aggressive and (left-handed), which helps,” Youngblood said. “She went to summer (basketball) camp and has been working really hard.”

“I’m looking forward to working with teammates and winning more games,” said Bray, 16.

While only a freshman, Morgan Farrah has plenty of basketball experience, having played in middle school and the summer, Youngblood said.

“Morgan is versatile,” said Youngblood, who plans to use her at point and shooting guard.

Becky Harhai, a 5-9 freshman, will play center.

Junior guard Milan Harris is strong defensively, Youngblood said.

Sophomores Rayon Williams and Tamorrow Thomas and freshman Jordan Butko are reserves.

“I’d like to see us be in the top three (or four) in the section,” said Youngblood, 29.

Steel Valley was sixth of seven teams in Section 4-AA last year.

“We may win a lot or we may not win a lot,” said Balishak, who will be 18 on Dec. 3. “I just want to help (my teammates) be good basketball players.”

Karen Kadilak is a freelance writer.


TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.