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Nancy Reagan, 1921-2016 | TribLIVE.com
Editorials

Nancy Reagan, 1921-2016

Jodi Weigand
| Monday, March 7, 2016 9:00 p.m
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Reuters
Former President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy wave while attending a gala celebrating his 83rd birthday in Washington in this Feb. 3, 1994, file photo.
ObitNancyReaganJPEG0bbb2
In this June 3, 2009, file photo, former first lady Nancy Reagan speaks in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, during a ceremony to unveil a statue of President Ronald Reagan. The former first lady has died at 94, The Associated Press confirmed Sunday, March 6, 2016.
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REUTERS
Former U.S. first lady Nancy Reagan smiles as she passes photographers after Texas Governor George W. Bush delivered his first major foreign policy speech at the Ronald Reagan Library in Simi Valley, California on Nov. 18, 1999.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nancy Reagan tapes a show for PBS concerning teenage drug and alcohol abuse on Wednesday, April 14, 1983, in Pittsburgh. The program offered was to fight drug abuse among young people.
ObitNancyReaganJPEG0bbb2
In this June 3, 2009, file photo, former first lady Nancy Reagan speaks in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, during a ceremony to unveil a statue of President Ronald Reagan. The former first lady has died at 94, The Associated Press confirmed Sunday, March 6, 2016.
AP8609260248
ASSOCIATED PRESS
First lady Nancy Reagan pats Kyle Gray on the head while making her way through a group of children from the Carnegie Mellon University Child Care Center after taping a segment of 'A Generation at Risk' at WQED-TV in Pittsburgh on Thursday, Sept. 26, 1986.
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AFP/Getty Images
This file photo taken on June 11, 2004, shows former first lady Nancy Reagan kissing the casket containing the remains of her husband, former President Ronald Reagan, at the Capitol rotunda in Washington, DC. Nancy Reagan died March 6, 2016, at age 94.
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AFP/Getty Images
This file photo taken on Aug. 15, 1988, shows first lady Nancy Reagan and her husband, President Ronald Reagan, at a luncheon in New Orleans honoring her for her work to combat drug abuse. Nancy Reagan died March 6, 2016, at age 94.
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Reuters
U.S. President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan leave the White House en route to Bethesda Naval Hospital for the president's physical exam in this Oct. 29, 1981, file photo.
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REUTERS
U.S. President Barack Obama clasps the hand of former first lady Nancy Reagan after he signed the Ronald Reagan Centennial Commission Act in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House in Washington in this June 2, 2009 file photo. Nancy Reagan, the former actress who was fiercely protective of husband Ronald Reagan through a Hollywood career, eight years in the White House, an assassination attempt and her husband's Alzheimer's disease, died on March 6, 2016 at age 94. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/Files
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AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) This file photo taken on May 10, 2000 shows former US President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan in Washington,DC, after she spoke at a White House Conference on 'Drug Free America. Nancy Reagan died March 6, 2016, at age 94, a spokeswoman for the Reagan Presidential Library and Foundation in Simi Valley, California said. Congestive heart failure was the cause of death, spokeswoman Joanne Drake said. / AFP / MIKE SARGENTMIKE SARGENT/AFP/Getty Images
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AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) This file photo taken on June 02, 2009 shows former US First Lady Nancy Reagan at the unveiling of a statue of her husband, US President Ronald Reagan, in Washington, DC. Nancy Reagan died of congestive heart failure on March 6, 2016, at her home in Los Angeles, according to a family spokesman. She was 94. / AFP / KAREN BLEIERKAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images
ObitNancyReaganJPEG0bbb2
In this June 3, 2009, file photo, former first lady Nancy Reagan speaks in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, during a ceremony to unveil a statue of President Ronald Reagan. The former first lady has died at 94, The Associated Press confirmed Sunday, March 6, 2016.
20160306T165752Z2044585610GF10000335866RTRMADP3PEOPLEREAGAN
Reuters
Former U.S. first lady Nancy Reagan, who spearheaded the 'Just Say No' anti-drug campaign during her husband's administration, testifies before a House Government Reform subcommittee in Washington in this March 9, 1995 file photo.
20160306T165728Z455758535GF10000335857RTRMADP3PEOPLEREAGAN
Reuters
Former President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy wave while attending a gala celebrating his 83rd birthday in Washington in this Feb. 3, 1994, file photo.
ObitNancyReaganJPEG0bbb2
In this June 3, 2009, file photo, former first lady Nancy Reagan speaks in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, during a ceremony to unveil a statue of President Ronald Reagan. The former first lady has died at 94, The Associated Press confirmed Sunday, March 6, 2016.
20160306T165723Z456838386GF10000335861RTRMADP3PEOPLEREAGAN
REUTERS
Former U.S. first lady Nancy Reagan smiles as she passes photographers after Texas Governor George W. Bush delivered his first major foreign policy speech at the Ronald Reagan Library in Simi Valley, California on Nov. 18, 1999.
AP8304140208
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nancy Reagan tapes a show for PBS concerning teenage drug and alcohol abuse on Wednesday, April 14, 1983, in Pittsburgh. The program offered was to fight drug abuse among young people.
AP8609260248
ASSOCIATED PRESS
First lady Nancy Reagan pats Kyle Gray on the head while making her way through a group of children from the Carnegie Mellon University Child Care Center after taping a segment of 'A Generation at Risk' at WQED-TV in Pittsburgh on Thursday, Sept. 26, 1986.

We could write at great length of the grace of Nancy Reagan. For she was one of the most graceful first ladies we ever knew. But her grace spoke for itself.

We also could wax poetic about Mrs. Reagan’s class. But no stanzas of ours could begin to do her class justice. So we respectfully demur.

What we will opine on, however, is the concept of true love.

“Love” is a word bandied about so nonchalantly these days that it almost has been rendered meaningless. A priceless commodity discounted by shallowness all too often has been rendered valueless.

But never for Nancy and Ronald Reagan. Their marriage of more than half a century was an object lesson in true love and a validation of the recipe that makes it — devotion, loyalty and mutual advocacy. Theirs, in words and in deeds, was the truest of true love stories. We should all aspire to the rich Reagan example.

Long ago wrote English poet A.C. Swinburne in “A Match”:

If love were what the rose is,

And I were like the leaf,

Our lives would grow together

In sad or singing weather,Blown fields or flowerful closes,

Green pastures or gray grief.

The true love of Nancy and Ronald Reagan was that match — a match that now will live on in heaven.

Categories: Editorials
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