Archive

ShareThis Page
Wisconsin, Michigan Republicans enact lame-duck limits | TribLIVE.com
Politics/Election

Wisconsin, Michigan Republicans enact lame-duck limits

The Associated Press
| Friday, December 14, 2018 7:36 p.m
543803543803c7e1c5030c834ba7be338e725edfcbe2
CORRECTS SOURCE AND PHOTOGRAPHER - Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker talks about legislation he signed into law and addressed his transitional agenda as he prepares to leave office during a news conference Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Green Bay, Wis. Walker signed a sweeping package of Republican-written legislation Friday that restricts early voting and weakens the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general, brushing aside complaints that he is enabling a brazen power grab and ignoring the will of voters. (Jim Matthews/The Green Bay Press-Gazette via AP)
543803543803472162c5467442a59d8b477cc0754fc0
Wisconsin Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers speaks to reporters during a news conference Friday, Dec. 14, 2018, in Madison, Wis., on lame-duck legislation designed to weaken his authority. (AP Photo/Todd Richmond)
543803543803c6638034779e4f6dad555dca050ce5a8
CORRECTS SOURCE AND PHOTOGRAPHER - Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker talks about legislation he signed into law and addressed his transitional agenda as he prepares to leave office during a news conference Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Green Bay, Wis. Walker signed a sweeping package of Republican-written legislation Friday that restricts early voting and weakens the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general, brushing aside complaints that he is enabling a brazen power grab and ignoring the will of voters. (Jim Matthews/The Green Bay Press-Gazette via AP)
543803543803db4ffd1a7755478fb40ab379045b1314
CORRECTS SOURCE AND PHOTOGRAPHER - Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker talks about legislation he signed into law and addressed his transitional agenda as he prepares to leave office during a news conference Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Green Bay, Wis. Walker signed a sweeping package of Republican-written legislation Friday that restricts early voting and weakens the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general, brushing aside complaints that he is enabling a brazen power grab and ignoring the will of voters. (Jim Matthews/The Green Bay Press-Gazette via AP)
5438035438039e79aeae062f4375ae2352a5bd7160ec
FILE - In this July 24, 2018 file photo, Gov. Rick Snyder answers questions after a press conference in Portage, Mich. Snyder has signed Republican-backed laws to significantly scale back citizen-initiated measures to raise the minimum wage and require paid sick leave for workers. The term-limited Republican governor's move Friday, Dec. 14, 2018, is sure to prompt a lawsuit over an unprecedented strategy adopted by lame-duck lawmakers. (Daniel Vasta/Kalamazoo Gazette via AP File)
543803543803e326e95816c8417faa79d0199bd61b4e
CORRECTS SOURCE AND PHOTOGRAPHER - Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker talks about legislation he signed into law during a news conference Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Green Bay, Wis. Walker signed a sweeping package of Republican-written legislation Friday that restricts early voting and weakens the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general, brushing aside complaints that he is enabling a brazen power grab and ignoring the will of voters. (Jim Matthews/The Green Bay Press-Gazette via AP)

Republicans in Wisconsin and Michigan enacted last-minute limits on Democratic power Friday, with outgoing GOP governors in both Upper Midwest states signing measures protecting their priorities before leaving office in less than a month.

Democrats derided the moves as desperate power grabs, while Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder downplayed the scope of their actions while defending their rights to do it.

“There’s a lot of hype and hysteria, particularly in the national media, implying this is a power shift. It’s not,” Walker said before signing bills that weaken powers of the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general and limit early voting to two weeks before an election.

The push in both states mirrors tactics employed by North Carolina Republicans in 2016.

Snyder signed measures to significantly scale back citizen-initiated measures to raise Michigan’s minimum wage and require paid sick leave for workers, finalizing an unprecedented Republican-backed legislative maneuver that opponents blasted as shameful.

To prevent minimum wage and earned sick time initiatives from going to voters last month, GOP lawmakers approved them in September. That allowed them to more easily alter the measures with simple majority votes rather than the three-fourths support that would have been needed if voters had passed the proposals.

The tactic — never done before — was pushed by the business community as necessary to avoid jeopardizing the economy. But it was criticized as an unconstitutional attack on voters’ will at a time Republicans in Michigan are trying to dilute the powers of incoming elected Democrats.

Snyder signed the bills in private and issued a statement calling them a “good balance” between what the ballot drives proposed and what legislators drafted initially.

“They address a number of difficulties for job providers while still ensuring paid medical leave benefits and increased minimum-wage incomes for many Michiganders,” he said.

Walker traveled 130 miles from his Capitol office to sign the bills in Green Bay, a more conservative city far from the liberal capital of Madison where protesters converged on the Capitol to voice opposition to the lame-duck legislative session two weeks ago.

Just two hours later, a group run by former Democratic U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced it planned legal action to block the limitation on early voting.

Members of both parties, including Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers and former Republican Gov. Scott McCallum, urged Walker to reject the legislation. Evers accused Walker of ignoring and overriding the will of the people by signing the bills into law.

“People will remember he took a stand that was not reflective of this last election,” Evers said. “I will be reviewing our options and do everything we can to make sure the people of this state are not ignored or overlooked.”

Walker, speaking after he signed the bills, brushed aside what he called “high-pitched hysteria” from critics of the legislation. He said his legacy will be the record he left behind that includes all-but eliminating collective bargaining for public workers, not the lame-duck measures.

Walker’s signing of the bills came a day after he announced a $28 million incentive package to keep open a Kimberly-Clark Corp. plant in northeast Wisconsin. One of the lame-duck bills would prevent Evers from making such a deal, instead requiring the Legislature’s budget committee to sign off.

In Michigan, Democratic state Rep. Christine Greig blasted Snyder.

“With a flick of his lame-duck pen, Gov. Snyder chose to rob the people of Michigan of the strong paycheck and good benefits they deserve,” she said in a statement. “It is shameful that this governor, who is just counting down the days to the end of his tenure, would use this opportunity to hurt the people of Michigan one last time.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.