Archive

ShareThis Page
Duquesne men come up short against NJIT | TribLIVE.com
Duquesne

Duquesne men come up short against NJIT

PTRDUKESNJIT07113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Desmond Ridenour has his shot blocked by NJIT's Odera Nweke on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT01113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's TySean Powell dunks during the Dukes' 84-81 loss to New Jersey Institute of Technology on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT02113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Darius Lewis backs NJIT's Odera Nweke down under the hoop Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT03113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's TySean Powell dunks during the Dukes' 84-81 loss to NJIT on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT04113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Micah Mason shoots over NJIT's Winfield Willis on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT05113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Micah Mason drives against NJIT's Winfield Willis on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT08113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Jordan Stevens shoots a 3-pointer with NJIT's Damon Lynn defending Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT09113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Derrick Colter takes a shot during the Dukes' 84-81 loss to NJIT on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.
PTRDUKESNJIT10113014
Sidney Davis | Trib Total Media
Duquesne's Dominique McKoy tips in the ball with NJIT's Ky Howard (0) and Odera Nweke defending Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, at Palumbo Center.

To coach Jim Ferry, the defensive problems Duquesne exhibited Saturday afternoon against New Jersey Institute of Technology seemed all too familiar.

Bringing back unpleasant memories of the past two seasons, the Dukes allowed NJIT to shoot 56.9 percent as the Highlanders came away with an 84-81 victory at Palumbo Center.

“It was awful defense,” Ferry said. “I didn’t see it coming in regards to that. We’ve been defending pretty well, significantly better than last year. To get outrebounded and allow a team to shoot 57 percent from the field is a really poor effort.”

Duquesne (2-1) came in giving up 66 points per game on 33.9 percent shooting. But NJIT (2-4) shot 61.9 percent from the field and 63.6 percent from 3-point range in the second half to overcome a 44-41 halftime deficit.

The Highlanders beat the Dukes at their own game, making 12 3-pointers, including six by Damon Lynn, who led all scorers with 27 points. Ky Howard added 16 points, and Winfield Willis had 13 for NJIT.

“I do not want to take any credit away from NJIT,” Ferry said. “They came in here, and they earned that win. But this is on us defensively. I thought we did a really, really poor job. We broke down in our man, we broke down in our zone, and I thought we showed our youth today both offensively and defensively.”

The Dukes’ offense averaged 96.5 points in wins over Bluefield State and Abilene Christian to begin the season. Although Duquesne made 12 3-pointers, the Dukes shot 38.2 percent in the second half to aid NJIT. Micah Mason led the team with 18 points on a career-high six 3-pointers, and Jordan Stevens added 16. Derrick Colter and TySean Powell scored 14 apiece.

“The shots are going to continue to get knocked down; we just need to continue to play unselfish,” Mason said. “But it starts on the defensive end. That’s what hurt us.”

The defensive problems cropped up early, as NJIT made four 3-pointers in the opening seven minutes to take a 22-13 lead. Duquesne rallied behind Stevens and Mason, who scored 10 and nine points, respectively, to stake the Dukes to a three-point lead at halftime.

NJIT made seven of its first eight 3-point attempts in the second half to take control of the game. Lynn gave the Highlanders the lead for good with a 3 at the 12:44 mark, and Willis hit back-to-back treys to put NJIT up nine with eight minutes left.

Trailing 82-73 with two minutes left, Duquesne made a late run. L.G. Gill hit a 3-pointer, and Colter scored on a layup and 3-pointer to make it 82-81 with 27.5 seconds left.

The Dukes had a chance to take the lead after NJIT’s Howard split a pair of free throws, but Gill’s 3-point attempt from the corner was blocked.

“We just proved to ourselves that we’re not going to outscore everybody,” Ferry said. “If that’s your approach, if you think you’re going to outscore people, then you’re not going to win. It’s scoring and defending. We have the ability to score. We obviously didn’t approach the game the right way defensively.”

Doug Gulasy is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at [email protected] or via Twitter @dgulasy_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.