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Marlins OF Stanton agrees to 13-year, $325M deal to stay in Miami | TribLIVE.com
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Marlins OF Stanton agrees to 13-year, $325M deal to stay in Miami

The Associated Press
| Monday, November 17, 2014 8:12 p.m.
MarlinsStantonBaseballJPEG0b049
FILE - This is a 2014 photo showing Giancarlo Stanton of the Miami Marlins baseball team. A person familiar with the negotiations says Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton has agreed to terms with the team on a $325 million, 13-year contract. It's the most lucrative deal for an American athlete. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Marlins hadn't confirmed the agreement Monday, Nov. 17, 2014.(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
MarlinsStantonBaseballJPEG0b049
FILE - This is a 2014 photo showing Giancarlo Stanton of the Miami Marlins baseball team. A person familiar with the negotiations says Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton has agreed to terms with the team on a $325 million, 13-year contract. It's the most lucrative deal for an American athlete. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Marlins hadn't confirmed the agreement Monday, Nov. 17, 2014.(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

MIAMI — The Marlins are no longer pinching pennies, and Giancarlo Stanton won’t be, either.

Stanton agreed to terms with the team Monday on a $325 million, 13-year contract, Miami owner Jeffrey Loria said.

It’s the most lucrative deal for an American athlete and averages $25 million per season, or $154,321 per game.

The deal includes a no-trade clause, and Stanton can opt out after six years, Loria said.

A news conference was planned for Wednesday.

“It’s a landmark moment for the franchise and Giancarlo, and it’s for the city and fans to rally around,” Loria said.

Any kind of multiyear deal is a big departure for the Marlins and Loria, whose frugal ways in the past alienated fans, angered the players’ union and made the franchise the butt of jokes.

Given such thriftiness, the Marlins’ generosity toward Stanton becomes even more stunning. His contract tops the $292 million, 10-year deal Miguel Cabrera agreed to with the Detroit Tigers in March. Alex Rodriguez signed the largest previous deal, a $275 million, 10-year contract with the Yankees before the 2008 season.

Stanton, who turned 25 on Nov. 8, perhaps is the game’s most feared slugger. He has 154 career homers despite playing home games in spacious Marlins Park.

“Giancarlo Stanton has come of age, and he’s going to be here a long time,” Loria said in a phone interview. “It’s wonderful to have a young man this caliber, integrity and ability, and I’m very happy.”

The Marlins right fielder wasn’t due to become eligible for free agency until after the 2016 season, and signing him to a long-term deal was considered a long shot. The Marlins haven’t reached the playoffs since 2003, and he seemed distrustful of the franchise’s direction.

Miami’s 2014 payroll of $52.3 million was the lowest in the majors. The last time they spent big was before the 2012 season, the first in their new ballpark. Then came a disastrous season and another salary purge, intensifying fan animosity toward Loria.

That sell-off and subsequent roster rebuilding set the stage for the Stanton deal, Loria said.

“Unfortunately people didn’t understand that two years ago, we had no choice,” the owner said. “I had to get to today.”

Loria said he doesn’t expect Stanton to opt out when he’s 31.

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