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Kenyan misses the course record by two seconds in EQT 10-miler | TribLIVE.com
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Kenyan misses the course record by two seconds in EQT 10-miler

Karen Price
| Sunday, November 9, 2014 12:06 p.m
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Leonard Korir raises his arms in victory on the South Side on Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014, as he crosses the finish line at the second annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Thousands of runners make their way down West Carson Street on the South Side Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014 as they took part in the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler. This year's event is Nov. 4.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Greg Sanchez of West Mifflin finds some self-generated heat from the garbage bag he's wearing on the South Side Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. Sanchez was joined by about 5,000 runners as they took part in the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler through the streets of Pittsburgh.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Sara Hall proudly displays the American Flag Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014 after being the first woman to finish the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh10 Miler through the streets of Pittsburgh.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
A gloved-runner picks out a banana after competing in the EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Stush Sadowski of Lawrence seems unaffected by the chilly temperatures on the South Side Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. Sadowski was joined by about 5,000 runners as they took part in the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler through the streets of Pittsburgh. 'Weather is not a factor,' reasons Sadowski. I ran my best race when is was nine-degrees.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Thousands of runners make their way down West Carson Street on the South Side Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014 as they took part in the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Thousands of runners make their way down West Carson Street on the South Side Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014 as they take part in the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Dr. Rory Cooper of Gibsonia raises his arms in victory as he is the first to cross the finish-line in Downtown Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. Cooper was joined by about 5,000 runners as they took part in the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler through the streets of Pittsburgh.
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Philip G. Pavely | Trib Total Media
Sara Hall edges out Buze Diriba in a sprint finish Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014 to win the second-annual EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler through the streets of Pittsburgh.

Leonard Korir’s late push was just enough to beat Nelson Oyugi to win the second EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler race in 46 minutes, 52 seconds Sunday morning.

Oyugi finished 4 seconds behind fellow Kenyan Korir, who missed a course record by 2 seconds. Third-place finisher Kimutai Cheruiyot finished in 47:49. Jonathan Grey, a York native who lives and trains in Minnesota, was the top American finisher in fifth place with a time of 48:16.

American Sara Hall, 31, won the women’s race in 53:47, setting a course record in a neck-and-neck finish with Buze Diriba of Ethiopia. Sophy Jepchirchir, who finished second in 2013 and set a record at the 2014 Pittsburgh Half Marathon, finished in third place in 54:19.

The 10-mile race, organized by Pittsburgh Three Rivers Marathon Inc., closely follows the marathon course, but in reverse. The starting line was on Carson Street near Station Square, then took runners through the North Side, Strip District and Lawrenceville before finishing on Liberty Avenue downtown. More than 4,100 participants finished the race.

The prize purse totaled $15,500, with the winners each getting $2,500.

It was Korir’s first time running the race, and Oyugi’s second. He also finished in second place in 2013, three seconds slower than Sunday’s time.

“The race was so good,” said Oyugio, 21. “I did my best to win, but I came in second. I tried to make a push, but he was faster than me.”

Temperatures were in the low 40s when the race began.

“The race was good,” said Korir, 28, who won two NCAA titles while at Iona College and now lives and trains in Tucson, Ariz. “It was a little chilly, cold a little bit, but it was OK.”

Grey, coming off an injury, stayed off the back of a lead pack of about seven runners. He said the pace was fast from the start, and the leaders kept throwing in difficult surges.

“I had to be patient and I kind of let them go, even the first American, for a bit,” he said. “It took until seven miles until I started moving forward, and then I just started running people down.”

Hall, 31, who has competed for the U.S. at three World Indoor Track & Field Championships and one World Cross Country Championship, was competing in the race for the first time.

“I led the first third of the race, but there was definitely a pretty chilly breeze so when the two Ethiopian girls made a move, I was happy to just tuck in for a bit,” she said.

Hall said she wanted to have one strong move at the end and knew that Diriba has a fast 5K time.

“I knew she’d have a good kick, too, but I wanted to just practice a tactical finish, so I was really happy with my speed at the end,” she said. “I was just praising God out there the whole time, just being thankful for having the gift of running that I enjoy so much.”

Eleven runners were treated by the race medical team, including nine at the finish line and two runners at one of three medical aid stations on the course. None was transported by ambulance to local hospitals.

Karen Price is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach her at kprice@tribweb.com or via Twitter @KarenPrice_Trib.

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