Archive

ShareThis Page
Three things to watch for in Penguins-Flyers Game 3 | TribLIVE.com
Penguins/NHL

Three things to watch for in Penguins-Flyers Game 3

gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.
gtrpensmain104041418
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Penguins' Bryan Rust can't control a rebound in front of Flyers goaltender Brian Elliott in the first period Friday during round one game two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs April 13, 2018 at PPG Paints Arena.

PHILADELPHIA – Given their losing record on the road this season, it’s reasonable to suggest the Penguins have a tough task ahead of them as their tied first-round series with the Flyers shifts to the Wells Fargo Center for the next two games.

It will only be tough, however, if the Flyers play well enough at home to take advantage of the situation.

The Flyers went 22-13-6 in Philadelphia this season, including two losses to the Penguins by a combined score of 10-3. Of the 16 teams that made the playoffs, only Los Angeles had a worse home record.

“I think we had a winning record at home, didn’t we? So we were OK,” Flyers coach Dave Hakstol said. “I’m not real worried about what the regular-season record was or games that are past. Only one that matters is (Sunday).”

Here are three things to watch in Game 3 Sunday afternoon.

1. BIG RIG WARNING

After joining the Penguins in a midseason trade, defenseman Jamie Oleksiak jumped right into the team’s biggest rivalry. He played some of his best hockey of the season in two games in Philadelphia, filling up the stat sheet with two goals, an assist, a plus-4 rating, 11 penalty minutes, four hits and four blocked shots.

“It’s just a result of how we play as a team,” Oleksiak said, explaining his success at the Wells Fargo Center. “Everybody’s up for that game, real excited for that game. You kind of feel in the locker room the focus and the intensity and everything. I think it brings everyone into it.”

Also keep an eye on the other five Penguins players who hit the scoresheet in both regular-season trips to Philadelphia this season: Riley Sheahan, Conor Sheary, Phil Kessel, Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

2. MATCH.COM

Hakstol will have the opportunity to use the personnel he prefers against Crosby’s line now that the series has shifted to Philadelphia. That’s good news for him, since whatever he was trying to do in Pittsburgh wasn’t working.

In the first two games of the series, when Crosby was on the ice at even strength, the Penguins had sizeable advantages in goals (5-0), shots (20-7), shot attempts (30-18), scoring chances (17-8) and high-danger scoring chances (8-2).

“I don’t think there’s been a ton of matching,” Crosby said. “Definitely coaches have in mind who they want out there in certain situations, but it’s not always necessarily based on who the other team is putting out there. As players, you just go out there when called upon and be ready to compete.”

3. BOUNCING BACK

If his postseason history is any indication, expect Matt Murray to have a bounce-back performance after a 15-save showing in Game 2.

Murray has started the game immediately following a Penguins playoff loss nine times in his career. He’s 8-1 with a .934 save percentage.

Jonathan Bombulie is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at [email protected] or via Twitter @BombulieTrib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.