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First call: See what Penguins top draft pick Calen Addison can do | TribLIVE.com
Breakfast With Benz

First call: See what Penguins top draft pick Calen Addison can do

Tim Benz
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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images
Calen Addison reacts after being selected 53rd overall by the Pittsburgh Penguins during the 2018 NHL Draft at American Airlines Center on June 23, 2018 in Dallas, Texas.
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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images
Calen Addison reacts after being selected 53rd overall by the Penguins during the 2018 NHL Draft at American Airlines Center on June 23, 2018 in Dallas, Texas.
GettyImages982083512
Getty Images
Calen Addison poses after being selected 53rd overall by the Penguins during the 2018 NHL Draft at American Airlines Center on June 23, 2018 in Dallas.

In “First Call” today, we debut the cotton-candy-wrapped hot dog. Also, highlights of the Penguins’ top draft choice. And what Brooks Orpik’s future may be after Washington traded him.


Calen Addison highlights

The Penguins didn’t have a first-round draft choice. Their top choice came in the second round. It’s Calen Addison. He’s a right-handed shooting defenseman from Lethbridge of the WHL.

Some are saying he could develop into another Kris Letang.

That’s pretty lofty stuff. He had 11 goals and 54 assists last year though. So that was 65 points in 68 games in the WHL. Only eight defensemen in the league had more.

As you can see in these highlights, he’s good at distributing the puck on the power play.

Addison says he models his game after Colorado’s Tyson Barrie. Size-wise, that’s a better comparison than Letang, who is at least 3 inches taller and more than 20 pounds heavier than Addison.


Tougher than you thought?

Last week we gave you the SteelerWire.com top 10 players list after 1979. That one wasn’t easy.

This week they came up with another tough one: the top 10 Steelers wide receivers.

The first five are pretty easy. It’s clearly Antonio Brown, John Stallworth, Hines Ward, Lynn Swann and Louis Lipps. That’s my order. They disagree. The order can be debated. But it’s got to be those five.

The next five? The pickings might be more slim than you think. Take a look.


J.C. stays in D.C.

Washington Capitals star defenseman John Carlson is staying in D.C. Keeping the stud blueliner was a top priority for the defending Cup champions.

It’s an eight-year contract worth $64 million, so an $8 million salary-cap hit.

Washington’s trade of former Penguin Brooks Orpik to Colorado helped make this deal possible under the salary cap. The Avalanche did Washington a favor there. That’s why goalie Philipp Grubauer was sent along with that contract.

Now, Orpik is being released and bought out by the Avs. Conceivably, Orpik can turn right around and sign back with the Caps again if he desires, just at a more cap-friendly rate.

Or he can go to any team that makes the highest bid.


We can dream, right?

Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver A.J. Green has no plans to hold out for a bigger contract. That news comes despite the fact that he is publicly backing Atlanta receiver Julio Jones’ attempt to get a larger deal. He skipped the Falcons’ mandatory minicamp.

Green has two years and $30 million left on his current arrangement in Cincy. The Bengals superstar actually seems content.

“I don’t really get caught up in what’s the money like because I signed my deal, and it was the highest-paid at that point,” Green told the Cincinnati Enquirer . “It’s going to always go up. So you can’t keep up with that.”

Wow. Realistic. Mature. Refreshing.

Are we really talking about an NFL receiver here?


Is this food?

Or a dare?

The Erie SeaWolves, Double-A affiliate of the Detroit Tigers, had “Sugar Rush Night.” The item they were really pushing? A hot dog wrapped in cotton candy and topped with Nerds candy.

Want any relish or mustard on that, sir?

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