Archive

Dodgers return home for Game 3 after getting cold shoulder at Fenway Park | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

Dodgers return home for Game 3 after getting cold shoulder at Fenway Park

379188379188b31c8328e37d4780b212ae07ab256193
A fan gets ready for the start of Game 2 of the World Series game between the Boston Red Sox and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Fenway Park Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Boston.

Fenway Park gave the Los Angeles Dodgers the cold shoulder.

No wonder they were California Dreamin’ about Thursday’s flight home.

“I think all the players are happy about going back to LA, but obviously we have some games to win,” pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu said through a translator after Wednesday night’s 4-2 loss to Boston dropped the Dodgers into a 2-0 World Series hole. “I think all the other players will be able to focus more and try to come back from this deficit.”

Fenway Park, at 106 the oldest big league ballpark, is crammed onto 9 acres in downtown Boston, the 37-foot-high Green Monster in left field a target for hitters and a terror for pitchers.

Dodger Stadium, a modern ballpark when opened in 1962 but now the third-oldest, sits atop 300 acres of land in Chavez Ravine near downtown Los Angeles, surrounded by tiered parking lots with palm trees beyond the fences and the San Gabriel Mountains shimmering in the distance.

While Fenway is urban tumult, Dodger Stadium symbolizes the sunny Californian way of life. But expect a pumped-up crowd for Game 3 on Friday.

“It’s going to be warmer, and hopefully our bats get hot, too,” Cody Bellinger said .

Used to the balmy breezes at home and usually hospitable weather in the NL West, Los Angeles hadn’t started a game this year in a temperature below 58.

Facing a 53-degree chill at the beginning of the opener, the Dodgers lost 8-4. It was just 46 in the first inning for Game 2, and the Dodgers’ bats were cold again — their last 16 hitters retired in order.

“This is the first time we’ve played in obviously weather like this — San Francisco a little bit, but nothing like this,” manager Dave Roberts said before the game.

No team has overcome a 2-0 Series deficit since 1996, when the Yankees lost twice at home to Atlanta before sweeping three games on the road and winning Game 6 in New York.

“We’ve got a tough road ahead of us, man,” Matt Kemp said.

Dodgers pitching coach Rick Honeycutt was annoyed at the conditions experienced by his relievers in a bullpen just in front of the right-field bleachers.

“Brutal. Pretty brutal,” he told Sports Illustrated. “What I don’t understand is why baseball allows it. You’ve got the rubber right there and people literally standing over you.”

Fenway’s frenzied fans benefit the Red Sox, a big league-best 57-24 at home during the regular season and 8-1 in the World Series since 2004.

When Los Angeles opened the Series at home last year, it was 103 degrees. A more temperate mid-80s is forecast for Friday, when rookie Walker Buehler starts against Rick Porcello in an attempt to spark a turnaround.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.