Archive

Technical difficulties upstage Mickelson’s win over Woods in ‘The Match’ | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

Technical difficulties upstage Mickelson’s win over Woods in ‘The Match’

The Associated Press
475294AP18328048809760
Phil Mickelson, right, embraces Tiger Woods after Mickelson won a golf match at Shadow Creek golf course, Friday, Nov. 23, 2018, in Las Vegas.
475294475294c26527e2b0844df1b1f84faa187942d1
Phil Mickelson hits off the second fairway during a golf match against Tiger Woods at Shadow Creek golf course, Friday, Nov. 23, 2018, in Las Vegas.
47529447529494b390d92db441c7bb03002295a0a7d6
Tiger Woods hits off the second tee during a golf match against Phil Mickelson at Shadow Creek golf course, Friday, Nov. 23, 2018, in Las Vegas.

Phil Mickelson beat Tiger Woods in overtime Friday in their $9 million pay-per-view match in Las Vegas that ended up free for many viewers because of technical problems.

Mickelson won on the 22nd hole, making a 4-foot birdie putt on a specially set up 93-yard, par-3. The match at Shadow Creek Golf Club finished under floodlights.

Mickelson said to Woods after the match: “Just know I will never let you live that down. It’s not the Masters or the U.S. Open, but it is nice to have a little something on you.”

Woods said he enjoyed the match, even if he was on the losing end.

“You couldn’t have made this event any better than it was,” he said. “It was back and forth and very competitive on a golf course that was playing on the tricky side.”

The match made for some compelling golf at times, if only most people would have been able to see it. Technical difficulties marred the event, which was billed as golf’s first pay-per-view broadcast.

Some viewers were unable to view it on their televisions after paying $19.95. Turner and Bleacher Report representatives sent out links on social media allowing people to view it for free on their computers and mobile devices.

There were more than 500 people on hold online waiting for assistance during one point.

“We experienced some technical issues on B/R Live that temporarily impacted user access to The Match. We’ve taken a number of steps to resolve the matter, with our main priority being the delivery of content to those that have purchased the PPV event,” Turner spokeswoman Tareia Williams said in an emailed statement.

Only 700 invited guests were allowed to watch the event at Shadow Creek. The match was billed as a chance for viewers to watch an untraditional golf broadcast as both golfers and their caddies were mic’d up. It also featured live odds from MGM resorts, and a drone was used for live shots.

There was some banter between Woods and Mickelson early on but not much as the stakes increased.

Mickelson said on the 15th hole to Woods that “I’m trying to be more talkative, but I’m not on this back nine.”

Woods understood and responded that they were going back to their old mode of “trying to beat each other’s brains in.”

The most revealing moment on the front nine happened after Woods missed a 4-foot par putt on the second hole to give Mickelson an early advantage.

“I was half a second from giving him that putt because he always makes those,” Mickelson said to his brother, Tim, who was his caddie.

Mickelson was 1-up through the front nine before Woods seized the lead with birdies on the par-4 11th and 12th holes. Mickelson then squared it with a birdie on the par-3 13th and retook the lead when Woods bogeyed the par-4 15th.

Woods tied it with birdie from the fringe of the green on the par-3 17th. Both birdied the par-5 18th and then parred the first playoff hole before it went to the par-3 extra hole — which was pitch shots off the practice putting green — that they kept playing until there was a winner.

After he birdied the 17th, Woods said to caddie Joe LaCava “just like old times, buddy.”

Mickelson also said it was like old times for him against Woods after that trademark shot.

“You’ve been doing that to me for 20 years. I don’t know why I am surprised now,” he said.

Mickelson also had the advantage in challenge bets. Woods won the first challenge for $200,000 when Mickelson didn’t birdie the first hole. Mickelson, though, won the next three, which were closest-to-the-pin challenges on par-3 holes, which totaled $600,000.

Both said they couldn’t see challenge bets become a part of regular PGA Tour events.

“Maybe at match play you could, but that might not be the best thing,” Mickelson said. “I think it added to the competition. It had that flavor of a Tuesday practice round with more at stake.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.