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Aircraft technician with Tuskegee Airmen dies at 100 in NYC | TribLIVE.com
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Aircraft technician with Tuskegee Airmen dies at 100 in NYC

The Associated Press
| Saturday, December 8, 2018 2:48 p.m
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FILE - In this April 15, 2012 file photo, from left, Tuskeegee Airmen Reginald Brewster, Dabney Montgomery and Wilfred DeFour applaud as Jackie Robinson's widow Rachel Robinson, far right, is introduced on Jackie Robinson Day before the New York Yankees' baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels at Yankee Stadium in New York. DeFour has died at 100 years of age. Police say a health aide found him unconscious and unresponsive inside his Harlem apartment Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018. Police say he appears to have died from natural causes. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

NEW YORK — A New York City man who served as an aircraft technician with the famed all-black Tuskegee Airmen has died at 100 years of age.

Police say a health aide found Wilfred DeFour unconscious and unresponsive inside his Harlem apartment Saturday morning.

DeFour was pronounced dead by Emergency Medical Service workers. Police say he appears to have died from natural causes.

DeFour was honored just last month at a ceremony to rename a Manhattan post office after the Tuskegee Airmen.

The Daily News reports that Defour said at the Nov. 19 ceremony that the World War II squadron’s members didn’t know they were making history at the time. He said, “We were just doing our job.”

DeFour served as a postal employee for more than 30 years after his military service.

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