Archive

ShareThis Page
Man rescued from West Virginia coal mine faces previous mine theft charges | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Man rescued from West Virginia coal mine faces previous mine theft charges

The Associated Press
| Sunday, December 16, 2018 8:18 p.m
5480395480393074031aa1a1486d87b7934705102712
Family and friends await word of the search teams efforts in finding Cody Beverly, Kayla Williams and Erica Treadway at the Salamy Memorial Center in Whitesville, W.Va., on Wednesday, December 12, 2018. The three were reported missing Saturday night, and are stuck inside the Rock House Powellton mine.
548039548039d5c20cfca8574a7b8e86d7e82cfc6c6b
Family and friends await word of the search teams efforts in finding Cody Beverly, Kayla Williams and Erica Treadway at the Salamy Memorial Center in Whitesville, W.Va., on Wednesday, December 12, 2018. The three were reported missing Saturday night, and are stuck inside the Rock House Powellton mine. (Craig Hudson/The Charleston Gazette-Mail via AP)

BECKLEY, W.Va. — One of four adults who recently made it safely out of an inactive West Virginia coal mine faces theft charges related to another mine, while two of the others have drug charges pending, according to court records.

Eddie Williams of Artie was indicted in May in Raleigh County on charges of trespassing, destruction of property and grand larceny related to the theft last January of copper wire from an Alpha Resources mine, The Register-Herald reported. His trial is pending.

A criminal investigation is ongoing in the case of Williams and three others who were the subject of a multi-agency rescue effort last week. Williams emerged from the mine on his own, while his cousin, Kayla Williams of Artie, along with Erica Treadway of Pax and Cody Beverly of Clear Creek were rescued Wednesday.

According to the mine safety office, coal has not been mined at the Rock House Powellton mine for two years. Inactive and abandoned coal mines contain toxic levels of gas, collapsing roofs, flooding, and other dangers may exist.

According to court records in Raleigh County, Treadway was charged in October with possessing a controlled substance without a valid prescription, while Kayla Williams was indicted in September on cocaine-related charges.

Copper can be sold as scrap metal and its theft from mines is not uncommon. Kayla Williams’ father, Randall Williams, has said she went into the Powellton mine in search of copper.

Media outlets report Beverly’s father, Brandon Lee Beverly, is currently serving prison time for a string of break-ins and thefts from mine sites, including stolen copper.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.